Soal Latihan dan Jawaban Reading Comprehension 49

Friday, March 23rd, 2012 - reading comprehension

In July of 1994, an astounding series of events took place. The world anxiously

watched as, every few hours, a hurtling chunk of comet plunged into the atmosphere

of Jupiter. All of the twenty-odd fragments, collectively called comet Shoemaker-

Levy 9 after its discoverers, were once part of the same object, now dismembered and

(5)  strung out along the same orbit. This cometary train, glistening like a string of pearls,

had been first glimpsed only a few months before its fateful impact with Jupiter, and

rather quickly scientists had predicted that the fragments were on a collision course

with the giant planet. The impact caused an explosion clearly visible from Earth, a

bright flaming fire that quickly expanded as each icy mass incinerated itself. When

(10)  each fragment slammed at 60 kilometers per second into the dense atmosphere, its

immense kinetic energy was transformed into heat, producing a superheated fireball

that was ejected back through the tunnel the fragment had made a few seconds earlier.

The residues from these explosions left huge black marks on the face of Jupiter, some

of which have stretched out to form dark ribbons.

 

(15)  Although this impact event was of considerable scientific import, it especially

piqued public curiosity and interest. Photographs of each collision made the evening

television newscast and were posted on the Internet. This was possibly the most open

scientific endeavor in history. The face of the largest planet in the solar system was

changed before our very eyes. And for the very first time, most of humanity came to

(20)  fully appreciate the fact that we ourselves live on a similar target, a world subject to

catastrophe by random assaults from celestial bodies. That realization was a surprise

to many, but it should not have been. One of the great truths revealed by the last few

decades of planetary exploration is that collisions between bodies of all sizes are

relatively commonplace, at least in geologic terms, and were even more frequent in

(25)  the early solar system.

Reading Comprehension 49

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Question 1
The passage mentions which of the following with respect to the fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9?
A
They have an unusual orbit.
B
They were once combine in a larger body.
C
Some of them are still orbiting Jupiter.
D
Some of them burned up before entering the atmosphere of Jupiter.
Question 2
The word "collectively" in line 3 is closest in meaning to
A
together
B
popularly
C
also
D
respectively
Question 3
The author compares the fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 to all of the following EXCEPT
A
a pearl necklace
B
a giant planet
C
a dismembered body
D
a train
Question 4
Before comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 hit Jupiter in July 1994, scientists
A
had been tracking it for only a few months
B
had decided it would not collide with the planet
C
had been unaware of its existence
D
had observed its breakup into twenty-odd fragments
Question 5
Before the comet fragments entered the atmosphere of Jupiter, they were most likely
A
exploding
B
black
C
frozen
D
invisible
Question 6
Superheated fireballs were produced as soon as the fragments of comet shoemaker-Levy 9
A
were pulled into Jupiter's orbit
B
entered the atmosphere of Jupiter
C
were ejected back through the tunnel
D
hit the surface of Jupiter
Question 7
The phrase "incinerated itself" in line 9 is closest in meaning to
A
burned up
B
increased its speed
C
grew in size
D
broke into smaller pieces
Question 8
Which of the following is mentioned as evidence of the explosions that is still visible on Jupiter?
A
black marks
B
ice masses
C
tunnels
D
fireballs
Question 9
Paragraph 2 discusses the impact of the comet Shoemaker-levy 9 primarily in terms of
A
the changes it made to the surface of Jupiter
B
its effect on public awareness of the possibility of damage to Earth
C
the effect it had on television broadcasting
D
its importance as an event of-great scientific significance
Question 10
The "target" in line 20 most probably referred to
A
Earth
B
a comet
C
Jupiter
D
the solar system
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