Soal Latihan dan Jawaban Reading Comprehension 46

Friday, March 23rd, 2012 - reading comprehension

By the turn of the century, the middle-class home in North American had been

transformed. “The flow of industry has passed and left idle the loom in the attic, the

soap kettle in the shed,” Ellen Richards wrote in 1908. The urban middle class was

now able to buy a wide array of food products and clothing-baked goods, canned

(5)      goods, suits, shirts, shoes, and dresses. Not only had household production waned,

but technological improvements were rapidly changing the rest of domestic work.

Middle-class homes had indoor running water and furnaces, run on oil, coal, or gas,

that produced hot water. Stoves were fueled by gas, and delivery services provided

ice for refrigerators. Electric power was available for lamps, sewing machines, irons,

(10)    and even vacuum cleaners. No domestic task was unaffected. Commercial laundries,

for instance, had been doing the wash for urban families for decades; by the early

1900′s the first electric washing machines were on the market.

 

On impact of the new household technology was to raw sharp dividing lines

between women of different classes and regions. Technological advances always

(15)    affected the homes of the wealthy first, filtering downward into the urban middle

class. But women who lived on farms were not yet affected by household

improvements. Throughout the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth, rural

homes lacked running water and electric power. Farm women had to haul large

quantities of water into the house from wells or pumps for every purpose. Doing the

(20)    family laundry, in large vats heated over stoves, continued to be a full day’s work,

just as canning and preserving continued to be seasonal necessities. Heat was

provided by wood or coal stoves. In addition, rural women continued to produce

most of their families’ clothing. The urban poor, similarly, reaped few benefits from

household improvements. Urban slums such as Chicago’s nineteenth ward often had

(25)    no sewers, garbage collection, or gas or electric lines; and tenements lacked both

running water and central heating. At the turn of the century, variations in the nature

of women’s domestic work were probably more marked than at any time before.

 

Reading Comprehension 46

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Question 1
What is the main topic of the passage?
A
The creation of the urban middle class
B
Overcrowding in American cities.
C
The spread of electrical power in the United States
D
Domestic work at the turn of the century
Question 2
According to the passage, what kind of fuel was used in a stove in a typical middle-class household?
A
coat
B
gas
C
wood
D
oil
Question 3
Which of the following is NOT mentioned as a household convenience in the passage?
A
the washing machine
B
the electric light
C
the refrigerator
D
the electric fan
Question 4
According to the passage, who were the first beneficiaries of technological advances?
A
The urban middle class
B
Farm women
C
The urban poor
D
The wealthy
Question 5
The word "reaped" in line 23 is closest in meaning to
A
wanted
B
affected
C
accepted
D
gained
Question 6
Which of the following best characterizes the passage's organization?
A
analysis of a quotation
B
comparison and contrast
C
extended definition
D
chronological narrative
Question 7
Where in the passage does the author discuss conditions in poor urban neighborhoods?
A
lines 3-5
B
lines 24-26
C
lines 9-10
D
lines 7-8
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