Soal Latihan dan Jawaban Reading Comprehension 03

Monday, February 27th, 2012 - reading comprehension

The first peoples to inhabit what today is the southeastern United States sustained

themselves as hunters and gathers. Sometimes early in the first millennium A.D., however,

they began to cultivate corn and other crops. Gradually, as they became more skilled at

gardening, they settled into permanent villages and developed a rich culture, characterized

(5)  by the great earthen mounds they erected as monuments to their gods and as tombs for

their distinguished dead. Most of these early mound builders were part of the

Adena-Hopewell culture, which had its beginnings near the Ohio River and takes its name

from sites in Ohio. The culture spread southward into the present-day states of Louisiana,

Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. Its peoples became great traders, bartering jewellery,

(10)  pottery, animal pelts, tools, and other goods along extensive trading networks that

stretched up and down eastern North America and as far west as the Rocky Mountains.

 

About A.D. 400, the Hopewell culture fell into decay. Over the next centuries, it was

supplanted by another culture, the Mississippian, named after the river along which many

of its earliest villages were located. This complex civilization dominated the Southeast from

(15)  about A.D. 700 until shortly before the Europeans began arriving in the sixteenth century.

At the peak of its strength, about the year 1200, it was the most advanced culture in North

America. Like their Hopewell predecessors, the Mississippians became highly skilled at

growing food, although on a grander scale. They developed an improved strain of corn,

which could survive in wet soil and a relatively cool climate, and also learned to cultivate

(20)  beans. Indeed, agriculture became so important to the Mississippians that it became

closely associated with the Sun – the guarantor of good crops. Many tribes called

themselves “children of the Sun” and believed their omnipotent priest-chiefs were

descendants of the great sun god.

 

Although most Mississippians lived in small villages, many others inhabited large towns.

(25)  Most of these towns boasted at least one major flat-topped mound on which stood a

temple that contained a sacred flame. Only priests and those charged with guarding the

flame could enter the temples. The mounds also served as ceremonial and trading sites,

and at times they were used as burial grounds.

 

Reading Comprehension 03

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Question 1
According to the passage, when did the Mississippian culture reach its highest point of development?
A
Between A.D. 400 and A.D. 700
B
About A.D. 400
C
About A.D. 1200
D
In the sixteenth century
Question 2
The word "bartering" in line 9 is closest in meaning to
A
producing
B
loading
C
transporting
D
exchanging
Question 3
According to the passage, how did the agriculture of the Mississippians differ from that of their Hopewell predecessors?
A
The Mississippians could only grow plants in warm, dry climates.
B
The Mississippians sold their food to other groups.
C
The Mississippians produced more durable and larger crops of food.
D
The Mississippians produced special foods for their religious leaders.
Question 4
What does the term "Adena-Hopewell" (line 7) designate?
A
The early locations of the Adena-Hopewell culture
B
Two important trade routes in eastern North America
C
Two former leaders who were honored with large burial mounds.
D
The two most important nations of the Adena-Hopewell culture
Question 5
The word "supplanted" in line 13 is closest in meaning to
A
imitated
B
replaced
C
preceded
D
conquered
Question 6
Which of the following resulted from the rise of agriculture in the southeastern United States?
A
Conflicts with other Native American groups over land
B
A migration of these peoples to the Rocky Mountains
C
The development of trade in North America
D
The establishment of permanent settlements
Question 7
Why does the author mention that many Mississippians tribes called themselves "children of the Sun" (line 22)?
A
To provide an example of their religious rituals.
B
To explain why they were obedient to their priest-chiefs.
C
To argue about the importance of religion in their culture.
D
To illustrate the great importance they placed on agriculture.
Question 8
What does the passage mainly discuss?
A
The construction of burial mounds
B
The development of agriculture
C
The locations of towns and villages
D
The early people and cultures of the United States
Question 9
According to the passage, the flat-topped mounds in Mississippian towns were used for all of the following purposes EXCEPT
A
burial sites
B
sites for commerce
C
meeting places for the entire community
D
religious ceremonies
Question 10
The phrase "charged with" in line 26 is closest in meaning to
A
passed on
B
experienced at
C
interested in
D
assigned to
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